Reviews Archive

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A Moon Shaped Pool convinced me that I was missing something. Or a lot of things.

Confession: Pool is my very first full-on Radiohead experience. I listened to Creep twice before (once, when an angsty ex sent it to me and another time because I decided […]

Confession: Pool is my very first full-on Radiohead experience. I listened to Creep twice before (once, when an angsty ex sent it to me and another time because I decided to go to karaoke and weirdly enough, it’s a bit of a staple) and I used to have Karma Police on my iPod because I saw that music video but that’s about it.

But A Moon Shaped Pool is the rare record that easily converts people into Radiohead fans as easily as Beyonce did for the Queen Bey herself. It’s emotionally resonant, powerfully composed and as experimental as Pink Floyd wished it was on their best days. It’s the rare album that makes the case for albums themselves as a form of art; to create and choose a series of tracks that, combined, convey so much more meaning than they can on their own.

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The Order: 1886 has the Potential to Be Something Great

When I first saw the E3 trailer for The Order: 1886, I was absolutely ecstatic. I have a very particular weakness for the aesthetic of Victorian England (though not the […]

When I first saw the E3 trailer for The Order: 1886, I was absolutely ecstatic. I have a very particular weakness for the aesthetic of Victorian England (though not the colonialism and the living conditions), so the lush visuals and smoky skylines of The Order: 1886’s alternate timeline London immediately caught my attention. An additional allure was the idea of fighting werewolves, territory that is surprisingly not very well trod by gaming at this point. (VtM: Bloodlines still has the scariest werewolf fights, let’s be honest). My anticipation grew with videos of gameplay, as running away from scary things while trying to shoot at them is a lifetime hobby of mine. My excitement just continued to increase, especially given how much I loved the design of Isabeau D’Argyll, and my curiosity about the world building the game would provide to explain the technology and mythology of their alternate London’s reality.

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Everything Old Is New Again (Again) In The HD Release Of Resident Evil.

Resident Evil HD is just like the Gamecube release of Resident Evil but even prettier so you should all buy it. Wow, that was easy. Who’s up for Red Robin’s […]

Resident Evil HD is just like the Gamecube release of Resident Evil but even prettier so you should all buy it. Wow, that was easy. Who’s up for Red Robin’s for lunch?

(Editor’s Note: Jerry we’ve talked about this)

Fine, fine.

In the year 2002, Resident Evil was still considered both a commercial and critical darling and were waiting for the fourth installment, which would not shake the gaming world until three years later. At the time director director Shinji Mikami would pause throwing out games and starting from scratch to go back to basics. And thus was released Resident Evil for the Gamecube, often called REmake by its fans, which retold the initial story of the first game. It wasn’t simply a port of the game like the Gamecube releases of Resident Evil 2 and 3 were. The game was completely reworked. The puzzles were more complicated, the game was bigger, the mansion looked prettier, and the voice acting… well, in Capcom’s defense have you seen the rates union actors require?

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Galavant Aspires To Great Things But Does Not Achieve

Swashbuckling adventure stories lend themselves well to self-parody, perhaps better than any other genre. It probably has to do with the genre already being rather comedy-heavy and light-hearted to begin […]

Swashbuckling adventure stories lend themselves well to self-parody, perhaps better than any other genre. It probably has to do with the genre already being rather comedy-heavy and light-hearted to begin with, but movies like The Princess Bride, Robin Hood: Men in Tights, and of course Monty Python and The Holy Grail have been cult classics due to how they play with the formula, the latter going into outright absurdity. Galavant is the newest attempt to join that list with one added twist. It’s also a musical with new songs in every episode. Such an ambitious idea alone is worth taking note for the month it takes up Once Upon A Time’s time slot.

The story opens with a song about our hero Galavant (Joshua Sasse) and how he’s gone off to rescue his one true love Madalena (Mallory Jansen) from the clutches of the evil King Richard. (Timothy Omundson) Unfortunately, when he comes to interrupt the wedding, he’s found that Madalena actually rather likes the comfort and privilege of being a queen. A depressed Galavant leaves the castle and proceeds to drink himself into a blind stupor. Two years later, he’s approached by Princess Isabella (Karen David) who needs her help to save her kingdom. With his squire Sid (Luke Youngblood) with them, they head off to adventure and hijinks.

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Heavyweight Champions of 2014: Life Itself

Biographies are hard. They’re hard to get into and they’re hard to make. And especially, they’re hard to make compelling. It all depends entirely on the material you have, whether the […]

Biographies are hard. They’re hard to get into and they’re hard to make. And especially, they’re hard to make compelling. It all depends entirely on the material you have, whether the person was prominent on their own or not and more importantly, whether the person had any history worth getting into. Filmed biographies are especially complicated due to the talking head format, where you have to select carefully the people you want and the questions you want to ask in order to create the portrait you want to come out. You also always run the risk of subjectivity in your portrait. All portraits are inherently subjective, of course, but you still want to create something that fully conveys the nature of the person you are representing to the spectator.

In Life Itself, Steve James challenges himself to obtain a portrayal that comes close to Roger Ebert’s autobiography. Not only does he succeed, he manages to immortalize Roger in his beloved art form in a way that was probably beyond his wildest dreams. Ebert is probably already one of the most beloved icons of the film industry, an achievement that is made more staggering by the fact that the man himself was almost never involved in the making of movies himself. But Ebert made up for this in sheer passion for what movies were, what they could be and his significant contributions towards bridging the gap between those two places.

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